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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,253 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 10:00am EST
to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city. so so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we're here to talk about this afternoon, the triumph of this city and all the cities, the triumph of the city, that's the title of harvard economics professor ed glaeser's book. it's about what's made cities around the world great, about the challenges that they have had to overcome and still face. we're going to talk about b that in a few minutes in the special context of this city with our panel, and we'll take questions from you as well later. but, first, to launch us off with a presentation, here's the author, professor ed glaeser. [applause] >> thank you. thank you, bob. and thank you all so much for being here. i'm so enormously flattered that you've decided to take time out of your saturday afternoon to come and talk about, about cities. i'm also particularly grateful to the boston book festival for including this book. i, like i think every single one of you, love books, and i'm just thrilled to be part of this amazing thing
SFGTV2
Dec 1, 2012 7:30pm PST
san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get the community together or you have people actually talking about it because the demand side, as we were talking about it, will be there because there is going to be someone there. there have to be people working with it who are getting out there. i think this is what this city is going to be really powerful. in terms of other cities doing as well, chicago is doing some really interesting stuff. scary cool stuff. they're taking 3 in 1 data, pothole request and crime report and matching it up with social media. they're getting this really deep and
SFGTV2
Dec 28, 2012 3:00pm PST
. >> it saves the city time and money. you are not taking up the time of a particular employee at the assessor's office. you might be doing things more efficient. >> they have it ready to go and say, this is what i want. >> they are finding the same things happening on the phone where people call in and ask, how do i find this information? we say, go to this website and they go and get the information easily. >> a picture tells a thousand stories. some say a map >> good afternoon ladies and gentlemen. for those that haven't please take your seats. again we so appreciate you all gathering on today's peace sunday. we appreciate you taking the time. we are certainly grateful for the special guest which we will come to momentarily. let me dispense with some of the acknowledgments on the on set and grateful to our mayor and our city officials who are here, chief wendy steel, and those from juvenile probation, commanders and briefs and we appreciate each of the city leaders being with us this morning. i am joined by joseph brian and the paster of the church works with the rainbow coalition.
SFGTV2
Dec 3, 2012 6:00am PST
to support the life and the growth of the city. philadelphia, throughout the 19th century, was the major industrial city of the united states. all of these industries used water from this system. and it served as a prototype for many american cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware highlands. and really diverted the water that normally went to philadelphia to new york city. i don't think they anticipated that. narrator: the majority of new york city's drinking water comes from watersheds in upstate new york. a watershed is the area of land where water from rain or snow melt drains downhill into a body of water. mountains act as a funnel to feed rivers and lakes. and in this case, reservoi
SFGTV
Dec 16, 2012 3:30am PST
started these street sweeping campaigns in the city. she started with kids. they had an exhibition at city hall. city officials heard about her efforts and they invited her to this facility. we thought it would coincide with our efforts to get folks to recycle, it is a great educational tool. since then, we have had 95 professional artists come through. >> how has the program changed over the years? how has the program -- what can the public has an artist engage with? >> for the most part, we worked with metal and wood, what you would expect from a program like ours. over the years, we tried to include artists and all types of mediums. conceptual artists, at installation, photographers, videographers. >> that has really expanded the program out. it is becoming so dynamic right now with your vision of interesting artists in gauging here. why would an artist when to come here? >> mainly, access to the materials. we also give them a lot of support. when they start, it is an empty studio. they go out to the public area and -- we call it the big store. they go out shopping, take the materials t
SFGTV2
Dec 14, 2012 3:00pm PST
on the on set and grateful to our mayor and our city officials who are here, chief wendy steel, and those from juvenile probation, commanders and briefs and we appreciate each of the city leaders being with us this morning. i am joined by joseph brian and the paster of the church works with the rainbow coalition. >> good afternoon. what a pleasure it is to be here and the patron saint of this great city work in the words of a prayer. lord, make me an instrument of your peace. as we look the things we realize the up tick of vlz is real and as we unified from all denominations and practices and speak simply. peace on earth and may this season be about peace. i commend mayor lee and work with him and resource ourselves and connect ourselves those in the city that believe our city can be a city of peace. as part of the rainbow coalition it's an honor to hold this today and jesse jackson and against violence prevention and that we can represent that well in the season of peace and we bring forward carolyn scott for our opening prayer of this peace hour. >> thank you reverend bryant. bow your
SFGTV2
Dec 15, 2012 8:30am PST
scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovere
SFGTV2
Dec 26, 2012 4:30am PST
and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a replacement. narrator: without half of its water supply, the city would shut down. for nearly 40 years, new york has been in the process of constructing a solution. man: this project is water tunnel number 3. we started on this project in 1969. i'm a sandhog. i've been a sandho
SFGTV2
Dec 22, 2012 8:30am PST
on water and wastewater infrastructure systems are actually paying for it. narrator: cities and municipalities across the united states are now facing this funding gap, between projected revenue and projected expenses, as they strive to maintain water quality and meet demand. new york is the most densely populated city in the u.s. and over 40 million tourists visit the city every year. the 1.3 billion gallons of water required every day are delivered by a system of extraordinary scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny,
SFGTV2
Dec 31, 2012 6:00am PST
: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from the delaware river, early engineers found that development along the waterfront was causing pollution. so their search led them to the nearby schuylkill river. philadelphia developed technologies to pump water from the river into the city. these technologies established engineering concept
SFGTV
Dec 26, 2012 6:30am PST
. but above all, we want to make sure that people can get around the city safely. it's no good to have a great transportation system if people can't get around safely. people need to not only be able to be safe, but to be able to feel safe, and nowhere is that more important than when you're on foot because that is when you're arguably the most vulnerable. it's also how every trip starts and ends. and many trips in san francisco, and we want more of them in between, to be on foot as well because it's a nicer way to enjoy the city. but if we want people to be out and walking, we need them to be safe. we want them to feel safe, and that's what we're here to talk about today. and none of that will happen without great leadership. so, without further ado, happy to bring up our great leader, the mayor of the city and county, ed lee. (applause) >> thank you. thank you, david. i'm the other ed. happy holidays, everybody, and thank you for being here. we are initializing our pedestrian safety, pedestrian strategy, and we've had a task force that have included our police department, our mta, our public
SFGTV2
Dec 15, 2012 8:00am PST
in the early 1960's, they became the first roles monument. the way city spread changed with the invention of the cable car. >> people know in san francisco, first thing they think about is, let's go across america, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water is a commodity that is essential to life. 100 years ago, it would have been hard to imagine turning on the tap water. and now, it's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're fini
SFGTV2
Dec 31, 2012 6:30am PST
. hurwitz: city tunnel number 3 will be an opportunity to take city tunnel 1 out of operation and rehabilitate it. city tunnel number 1 had one valve to shut off the whole tunnel. city tunnel 2 had two parallel valves. city tunnel 3 has 32, so there's much more redundancy. lloyd: we're targeting a completion date of 2012 for tunnel 3. and we already are starting to prepare to take tunnel 1 offline. narrator: the construction of tunnel 3 is vital for maintaining the sustainability of new york's drinking water infrastructure. but the pipeline is useless if there's not a reliable supply of clean water within it. hurwitz: the city bought up land around the reservoirs to prevent it from development. it provides assistance to local residents to see that there's no pollution of the reservoirs. it's much more cost effective to prevent pollution and to protect a source of water than to remove it at the drinking water treatment plant. lloyd: what epa said to us was, "you can have an exemption from filtration "if you keep this undeveloped, "and if you can manage the wastewater so that it
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 9:00am EST
at rolling stone magazine who grew up in the detroit area returns to the city to present a history and profile the influx of artists, environmentalists and city planners who are reemerging the urban landscape. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you all for coming. i have to say first i am honored that mark asked me to be part of this world trends from ann arbor where we went to college and we are both editors at the college newspaper. i knew then that mark was from the area like i am, but i didn't know his passion to write history and the stories here can that leads to my first question which is what led you to want to write this book? remember you calling me when you were starting to work on it and said i want to write a book about detroit and so do i. but this turned out to be a very different book than most of the others. >> i said that a little tiny bit when i went out to lunch the first time and you were one of the first people, thank you first of all for doing this but i guess i have always been drawn to detroit. i thought for the longest time that it would t
CBS
Dec 27, 2012 11:00pm PST
was targeted. >> at this point, it appears to be completely random. like many cities in the bay area, residential burglaries are on the rise and have been for quite a while. >> reporter: a helicopter and search dog were unable to locate the suspects. and officers have only a vague description of the three men. however, they were able to recover some of the personal effects that were stolen. they were dropped during the chase. live in antioch, christin ayers, cbs 5, we are following a developing story in the east bay. police are investigating a shooting at the pittsburg-bay point bart station. now, bart authorities say they got the first call just before 7:00 tonight. they found the victim in the parking lot. he was taken to john muir medical center in walnut creek with life-threatening injuries. bart police have not released any information on the victim or possible suspects. the shooting investigation caused major delays for bart riders. >>> crime in oakland is out of control. but tonight, health is on the way. a former big city police chief has been hired to offer the city some sol
SFGTV2
Dec 17, 2012 6:30pm PST
with that, i'm happy to take any questions. >> i may permit consultant in the city. i want to thank you for coming to this because it shows that you really care. i want to ask you a question. some of then transfers for an eatery that serves beer and wine to patrons, when someone wants to transfer or someone else wants to buy the license, if it says on there now live music or no entertainment, and the new person that -- no live music or no entertainment, and the new person that purchases it, they want to modify the conditions. they realize if a petition to modify the conditions, they run the risk of maybe not having the license transfer to them should the modifications be declined. some of these laws on the books a little archaic, and i will give you an example. we now have live entertainment in san francisco, which allows amplified music until 10:00 p.m. if the conditions has no entertainment, and the entertainment, it also includes this limited live provision. we have determined in the city that this legislation is good -- good legislation. there's no conditional use requirement to
SFGTV2
Dec 31, 2012 5:00am PST
statutes. this governor is very pro- expansion of business. and in favor of things that make this city and state great. there is mileage from your local representatives on this. the governor is going to be supportive of whenever you want to do in the city of san francisco. -- what ever you want to do in the city of san francisco. >> i own a corner bar and i'm basically in the same boat. i am an entrepreneur and i want to open another bar and not got a lease in hand. i'm in danger of losing the lease because i cannot find a license. what i am wondering is, is it possible for that number -- i did not know we were saturated. is it possible for that number to change? can we control the market driven licenses, perhaps? you hear of a license is going for sale in new york or new jersey for half a million dollars. that makes a small-business man like me, that boggles my mind. and it boggles my mind to think i might have to go up to two hundred thousand dollars. what is the likelihood of the supply increasing to meet the demand? the city is growing. in south beach, there are cranes everywhere.
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:00pm EST
, that is such a poetic occupation. i can't believe nobody's written this. then i got to look and sound of the city had turned down any team than six times by an arsonist. i thought who is this guy? said basically in the true crime writer. that's what i would have to. and then i found out one of these firemen was tom sawyer who told -- i forgot his name, robinson of the call he'd run with first volunteer fire department in california and that was brodrick one. back in new york more tom was a runner, a porch boy coming it in the competition among brodrick came us to make his fortune, he basically wanted to be a senator. that's what his plan was. tom came along and an assortment of the weirdest guys you ever saw, the worlds ugliest man, have you a chance, murderous, gunslingers, conmen, just absolutely amazing people. i thought it got to write this. as i work in a release we are very close to it the tom sawyer met mark twain in may of 1863 about three blocks from here. the old thing in the same room. twain liked to talk to tom because tom movies free stories and they played cards and drink here matching
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 7:00pm EST
magazine" returns to the city to present a history and profile the influx of artists, environmentalists, and city planners who are reimaging the urban landscion. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> i'm thrilled mark asked me to be a part of this. as they said, old friends from ann arbor where we went to college and editors at the college newspaper. i knew then that mark was from the area, like i am, but i didn't know of his intense interest in history and the stories here, and so that leads me to my first question which is what really led you to want to write this book? i remember you calling me when you were starting to work on it, and you said, i want to write a book about detroit. i thought, yeah, well, so does everybody; right? [laughter] this turned out to be a different book than others we red now. >> i sensed that a tiny bit when we got lunch. you were one the first people i talked to about it, and thank you, first of all, for doing this. i guess, i don't know, i've always been drawn to detroit as a topic, and, you know, i thought for the longest time it would be a nove
SFGTV2
Dec 3, 2012 6:30pm PST
in the city that this legislation is good -- good legislation. there's no conditional use requirement to have this. a lot of people today want to have food, drink, and be able to have some music. how can we get the limited live entertainment excluded from the know amplified or no live entertainment excluded on the transfers? >> that is going to mostly driven locally. most of the conditions you'll ever see on an abc license are because we rely, to a great extent, on the police department and local officials to determine what is best for their communities. i'm not trying to pin this on you guys or blame you guys, but we do try to work with you. we do not tend to want to overrule the police department very often. now that said, i get a fair number of petitions and appeals to me. typically, they are from the neighbors. i want to see that there is actually a practical problem posed -- that the condition is there to solve, not that this is the way the things have been or maybe there's someone who is satisfied by what is potentially wrought by having live entertainment. it is always a case by case.
SFGTV2
Dec 3, 2012 5:00am PST
of the supply increasing to meet the demand? the city is growing. in south beach, there are cranes everywhere. we will need these licenses. how will we get them? >> i can repeat what i just said, but in part, that is something that we need to have pushed from the local. right now, there is a bill applying to napa. i'm sorry, marin county. it is the same sort of problem. part of the argument is -- just like i it was a kid coming in, people come in from all over the area to eat in san francisco restaurants. they come from all over the world. again, this governor is going to support everyone locally. i lot of that will have to come from you to accomplish what is right for the city. how do we do that? >> [unintelligible] >> i blame these guys for conditions. this time, i will blame fee on the mall and senator leno. -- fiona ma and senator leno. their limited by statute, but that is very difficult to have much room to maneuver. >> you said to organize local bars. i have been trying to do that for a few years now. we have our sixth annual event coming up in september. we have been trying to get to
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 9:00pm PST
for several years and exchange oragami decorations and kind of a symbolic friendship act here in city hall and don't forget that san francisco is where the united nations is was founded. one more thing that was very interesting to me this year the council general's wife coordinated the gathering of wishes for the tree of hope for 40 other consulates around the globe. >> thank you for doing that. the mayor of san francisco, the council general of japan and his name is... wait a minute, i have it. his name is heroshi, imamata. >> happy holidays everyone, welcome to the great city of san francisco, that dress, donna will make santa claus stay up all night. any way, i want to welcome everybody again to city hall, and to view our wonderful, wonderful tree of hope. it is something that i enjoy every year that it has been here and i tell you when it was announced that this was the tallest, largest tree of hope in the united states, if not in the world, i also wanted to say my very first thought was san francisco has always the biggest hearts in the world, thanks to all of you. thank you, donna, f
SFGTV2
Dec 9, 2012 4:30pm PST
that you have been to in the city hall in this one rotunda or one of the offices and so many wonderful weddings and so many celebrations and so many heart rending speeches and yes, some sad occasions too. all a part of our community and our beautiful city. as you look around this room tonight, what a diverse combination we have. it makes me smile, but it probably doesn't make nebraska smile. we live in a richly diverse city and our elected officials represent it and our events here represent it and the tree lighting should represent it and indeed it does, we call it the tree of hope. and every year we get messages from all over the country and all over the world that are put on origamis and put on this very unique, unusual tree. >> there are many cities that have holiday trees, but no one has the tree of hope. it was started by an organization and now i will have the chance to introduce you to that organization's founder and executive director. who failed to put this in the proper amount of type here. no little things happen. the sound is better, i think that you can hear and i just ha
SFGTV2
Dec 10, 2012 11:00am PST
and city hall events department. we worked them for seven years and they are always wonderful. and so thank you. >> it was his idea in the beginning. he must be very proud. that is a beautiful tree. and there are hundreds of cranes, when you look at it from here, it looks like it is snow-covered the tree. but you are in san francisco, that is not snow, those are oragami and each one has to be folded and it is an incredible project. i always thought of it as something that they just kind of did in class that you were bored, but no it is an art form and it makes a beautiful tree and behind all of that creativity is a person whose name was just mentioned. she has been here all seven years, linda mahara and she is a professional oragami artist. and you may know her work and not realize that you know her work. she has done professional training for febrese disney and pixar and she is here today because this is part of her labor of love, the world three of hope. let's welcome linda. mihara. >> thank you, donna, that is a wonderful introduction and you do look magnificent. >> you too. >> thank you
SFGTV2
Dec 27, 2012 8:30pm PST
and it is really has been a community effort from the city. and it has been an amazing project. each crane takes about 30 folds to create. and we have over 10,000 ornaments on this tree this year and this year's tree is 23 feet tall, and it is four and a half feet taller than the white house tree. and it is the world's largest oragami tree. [ applause ] and it took 250 volunteers to prep the models everything has to be hand folded and wired and fire proofed and then, of course, decorated or placed on to the tree. it is really an amazing thing to look up close and think about what your hope and wishes for the world. we have given all the wishes wings and we hope that all of the wishes come true, especially the wishes of the children, thank you very much. anybody else just get chills? it gives so much more meaning to the tree. wow that is a lot of hours and i am not good at math but i think that it is a lot of hours, i can't imagine. and you have to love what you are doing. one more hand for linda and she does a wonderful job. it is really do get wishes from all over the world and we love to read
SFGTV2
Dec 31, 2012 3:00pm PST
in this city. we have been a city of hope for so many other cities throughout the country, but we also struggle ourselves. we have the same problems, and we've got to i think produce models that potentially have answers for everybody else, so i will continue talking about this. it is part of who i am. it's the part of me that keeps me focused on what i have to do in this city, and just because we win a world series that we have technology companies coming in that will not allow me to rest. that is not something i say makes me so happy. i am happy if every community in the city experiences the hope that others have in the city and you can't do that if you have a lot of violence so thank you very much for being here today and i invite you to continue dialoguing with us and consider this yet another beginning of this effort that we will continue on and on. thank you. [applause] >> thank you mr. mayor. let me pause here just before we bringure our next speaker and presenter to acknowledge each of the members of clergy and faith leaderships, so if you're here and a part of clergy or faith leade
CNN
Dec 30, 2012 1:00am PST
by phone. >>> gangs and guns, a deadly mix in chicago that's getting more dire by the day. the city marked a grim milestone this week, 500 murders so far this year. it was a shooting on the city's west side thursday that pushed the number to 500. police say a 40-year-old man was shot in the head outside a convenience store. another troubling number, 270, that's the number of children who have been killed by guns in chicago in the last five years. back to this year's 500 homicides. that's up 50% from last year. it is the highest the murder rate has been in the city since 2008. it was 512 then. what's going on here? some say it's a police problem, that chicago police are simply outnumbered and outgunned. unable to handle the influx of kids who want to kill kids to make some cash or to climb the social ladder in chicago gang life. or is it a gun problem? the city has some of the toughest laws on the books. but the chicago police department says 87% of the homicides this year are a result of gun violence. so let's talk. joining me tonight for this conversation, tio hardiman. and harold pollack
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,253 (some duplicates have been removed)